Tag Archives: death

A Different Perspective: You Are Everyone and Everyone Is You

Thanks to StumbleUpon I came across an interesting piece of writing by a man named Andy Weir. It’s a second-person narrative and concept dialogue that gives a different perspective on why we are here on this Earth and what happens to us after we die. And although I personally do not believe in any specific god, in reincarnation or any other concept stated in the story, I found it entertaining and a nice idea to ponder.

It’s called “The Egg”, and what takes place in this piece is a conversation between “God” and a middle-aged man in his afterlife. God tells him that the man is dead, and that he will be reincarnated to a Chinese peasant girl in 540 AD. Confused, the man asks why and how can he be reincarnated into someone who has already lived in the past (and even someone of a different gender). God states that time is just a man made concept, and that, to God, things are different.

The man then asks what many of us on Earth would ask if ever in this situation:

“So what’s the point of it all?”

Below is the conversation that takes place afterwards:

“The meaning of life, the reason I made this whole universe, is for you to mature.”

“You mean mankind? You want us to mature?”

“No, just you. I made this whole universe for you. With each new life you grow and mature and become a larger and greater intellect.”

“Just me? What about everyone else?”

“There is no one else,” I said. “In this universe, there’s just you and me.”

You stared blankly at me. “But all the people on earth…”

“All you. Different incarnations of you.”

“Wait. I’m everyone!?”

“Now you’re getting it,” I said, with a congratulatory slap on the back.

To read the rest of the story, go to Andy Weir’s website here: “The Egg” by Andy Weir.

So what if we, our individual selves, were everyone? What if everyone was simply a different aspect of yourself? I found it really interesting and began to wonder what my life would mean if I were everyone and if everyone were simply different reincarnations of me in different periods of time: past, present, and future.

Maybe we’re all just one universal being, and we live to learn and slowly mature at different times and paces. And everything that I know will not simply disappear after I die, because it lives on within everyone else. And as the universe matures, we will slowly grow from an infantile egg to something much grander.

Confusing, eh? Although this is an old and rather far-out concept, I actually found some peace in wondering if – somehow – every single person on this Earth is at least a reflection or symbol of some part of myself.

There are those people I fear, because they are similar to my own traits in which I fear. There are people I admire, because they reflect the traits in which I like, the traits in which I own or the traits that I want.

It gave me a strange, yet calming peace to think that maybe I have nothing to fear besides those darker parts of my own self. But ah… maybe this also means I hold the power to change me and, in doing so, I have the power to change the world. In keeping my mind open to this, I can face my fears one by one.

So, maybe we are all of the same universal being. Or maybe we aren’t! I felt “The Egg” was a refreshing, thought provoking look at the very meaning of life, and though it may or may not be true, I can genuinely say my mind is open to this exciting possibility.

What do you think, readers?

Learning of Life From Death

Given the recent deaths of many known faces, I felt it necessary to remind us of what we can learn from our inevitable fates. Death is a scary subject, but why? The thought of one day losing your loved ones or embarking from your present life may sit in your stomach like a stone and send chills though your nerves.

You may not be here tomorrow. Anyone you interact with and see on a daily basis may not be here tomorrow. It is fact that many people living now will not be around the next day.

After the initial shock of fully realizing my own mortality, I have been teaching myself not to fear death. It is painfully difficult to accept, but I feel we must in order to appreciate life – and the word’s very meaning – wholly.

We are extremely lucky to be able to experience this complex array of emotions from love to hate to generosity and jealousy. As William Faulkner once said,

“Between grief and nothing I will take grief”

To be able to meet unique people of different colors and personalities, to see all the wonders and horrors we see, to even be given a chance at love and even loss is far greater than not to be able to experience it at all.

Your most valuable thing is not your house, your car, your mother’s ring, or even your children. Your most valuable thing is your life. Everything you know, love, and cherish falls under this. So instead of wasting your most valuable thing worrying about the inevitable, focus on how great it is to even have it at all!

Cherishing Life Now

If you’ve been taking your life for granted in the past, it’s not too late. I won’t tell you that you shouldn’t smoke cigarettes and that you should start exercising more, but I do highly recommend these things. However, living a healthy lifestyle is a separate topic plastered all over the internet already.

What I want to give you are some small, non-conventional ways for you to begin or to continue cherishing your life and focusing on the journey and not the final destination.

Laugh at Life
Laughing is a good medicine and great comedy keeps your mind down to Earth and in the present.

  • Find a new comedian that you like (there are many out there!) and share them with your friends.
  • Go to local comedy shows.

Be Silly and Have Fun
Life doesn’t have to be serious 24/7. You can do whatever you want with your most valuable possession so have fun with it.

  • Write fake journal entries about crazy adventures you went on and the people you met.
  • Mute the television and do voice-overs with your friends.
  • For a day, dress as someone different, take a new identity, and visit a town where no one knows you.

Observe and Appreciate Beauty

  • Sit in a public place and observe your surroundings. What kinds of people do you see? What are their lives like? What are they feeling?
  • Notice different types of architecture, different color palettes in art, and how much work and thought was put into everything you see.
  • Read up on the history of technology, art, or the country you live in. See how far we’ve come in such a short time. We’re still advancing.

Ask Why
Questioning the world around you can create appreciation for what is already here.

  • Why do we do what we do?
  • Why do we work?
  • Why do we take photographs?
  • Why do we celebrate?

Appreciate Yourself

  • Find your identity and what makes you you.
  • Take dozens of pictures of yourself doing anything anywhere and everywhere for a day. Don’t delete any of them and pick out only something you like in each.
  • This may seem morbid, but write an obituary for yourself stating your accomplishments. This can help you realize how much you’ve done already and what you want to do in the future.
  • Interview your friends and family and ask them what their favorite trait of yours is.

Other Ways

  • Celebrate anything – big or small- like reaching a goal, getting a day off, making it to Friday, or just a nice and sunny day.
  • Talk to people. We humans share the same world so share your life experiences. Have a conversation about anything, and dig deeper than the norm. Ask for their opinion, tell them what you know, and keep it flowing. The world is filled with endless conversation topics.
  • Treat others as if they will be gone tomorrow. It is possible and unpredictable, so watch what you do and say and how you treat people and do not do anything you feel you will regret.
  • Take in life through all five senses. Our senses are the doors we use to take in life as it is so take advantage of them and experience as many smells, feels, tastes, sights, and sounds as you can!
photo credit: allyaubry | 23am | L. Marie | EdenPictures
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